Have Fun Exploring This Blog and the Related Links We Share!

Thank you for visiting. NOTE: You may need to pause AdBlock in your browser to fully enjoy this site.

Tumblr for FoodiesShop and Earn!My Shopping ChannelRx4Wellness Health TipsMy Fox Nooze

The Health Food Store ~ your one stop shop for healthy, gluten free, innovative products.

Salsa Express ~ The original and largest source for gourmet fiery foods since 1991. Gift packs, popular salsas, hot sauces, dip mixes, and fiery snacks delivered quickly for your next celebration!

Personal Chef To Go ~ Say goodbye to dieting and say hello to delicious, everyday gourmet meals for today's health conscious consumer. Enjoy fine dining restaurant quality meals at half the cost!

*

*

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Five Exotic Spices by Melisa Marzett (Guest Post)

Even though many herbs and spices are now readily available in local grocery stores all around the world or can easily be purchased online, most of us don't know know the history of these marvelous cooking ingredients and which country is responsible for introducing these exciting flavors to the global community.  Sharing a brief introduction to five (5) exotic spices:

SPICE Spotlight: Juniper Berries

http://everydayspices.webs.com/apps/blog/show/6664512-spice-spotlight-juniper-berries


1. Asafetida. This is an Asian spice made from the roots of certain species of Ferula. It is a gum-like spice with a very strong and unpleasant smell.  Actually, the name of the spice has a Latin origin, which means “evil-smelling gum”.  Asafetida is common in Indian vegetarian cuisine and is often the main ingredient in rice and bean dishes. Additionally, it has a wide range of medicinal properties and is beneficial for people with digestive disorders, high cholesterol, and/or nervous disorders.  Asafetida is rich in minerals and nutrients, such as iron, calcium, phosphorus, and protein.  Although most chefs and cooks rarely prepare a dish without onion and garlic, some people do not eat onion or garlic.  Certain people are allergic to onions and for some people, garlic causes extreme heart burn.  Asafetida is an ideal spice for those people.  In fact, its smell is similar to both onion and garlic.






2. Dried Avocado Leaves.  This spice (or herb) originated in Mexico. It is one of the most popular spices in Mexican cuisine.  Avocado leaves have an aniseed fragrance; however, these dried leaves are odorless and have a pungent taste. Dried avocado leaves are added to bean or meat dishes. Regarding health benefits, they are useful for people who have kidney stones and hypertension. Noteworthy:  Only certain varieties of avocado leaves are to be used in cooking or for medicinal purposes because some kinds of avocado leaves can contain toxic substances.

Additional References:

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredientby Victoria ChallancinLove at First Bite. Like any motivated foodie, I almost made myself sick sampling, musing, and guessing what unknown ingredient I was tasting in what appeared to be an ordinary black bean dip.


3. Epazote. This is another essential spice used in Mexican cuisine. Its extraordinary (or strange) scent can be described as a combination of kerosene, mint, and citrus. Epazote is made from the leaves of Mexican herb called dysphania ambrosioides (aka "Mexican tea").  It is used with bean and meat dishes. Additionally, it can be used in soups.

Additional Reading and Recipes:




4. Grains of Paradise. This delicious spice is an integral part of West African cuisine. It is obtained from a flower called Aframomum melegueta. Africans believed that this flower grew in Eden. Grains of paradise look like seeds and have jasmine, citrus, and hazelnut odor. It can be added to meat, fish, and potato dishes.

Link of Interest:
Find spices ordered according to the region:
GEOGRAPHIC SPICE INDEX


Ras El Hanout (4.0 Oz) By Zamouri Spices

Ingredients include over 30 different herbs and spices, such as: 

 Grains of Paradise, Lavender, turmeric, ajawan seeds, kalajeera, ginger, galangal, oris root, rose buds, monk's pepper, cinnamon and more!



5. Juniper Berries. Actually, juniper berries are more likely to be cones than berries. It has the smell of fir and is used for cooking meat dishes, especially stewed rabbit or beef. These “berries” grow on the juniper tree, are common throughout Europe,  included in ancient Greek recipes, and have been found in the Egyptian pyramids.  A wide range of German traditional dishes are cooked with juniper berries.



♦  Hope you enjoyed this intro.
About the writer:  Melisa Marzett works for: bigpaperwriter.com.  She does excellent research and can pen articles and supply blog publishers or website owners with quality content on almost any topic.  View the About tab on her Google+ profile for more samples of her work.



Since you're here please feel free to continue perusing this blog. Below is a list of the 15 most recent posts. Leave comments. Share with friends and family.



Follow

Search All of Our Foodie Sites. Hope You Find What You're Looking For!

Custom Search

Didn't Find What You Wanted? Search the Web!

Custom Search

About the Blog Publisher

My photo

Treathyl Fox aka CmoneyspinnerHome Business Entrepreneur. Self-employed and loving it!   Real Estate Investor. Purchase/resell private notes secured by real estate, and acquire real estate through creative financing techniques. ♦ Blogger - Blogjob, Blogspot, LiteracyBase, Food Ways.  ♦ Freelance writer / Articles - Niume, Wizzley, HUBPagesWritedge, Daily Two Cents, PersonaPaper. ♦ Affiliate MarketerGrocery & Gourmet, Feng Shui - Home & Garden, Health Insurance, My Shopping Channel, Webnuggetz - The Other Shopping Channel. ♦ Randomness Over-blog, MyLot

♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦

~ DISCLOSURE: In compliance with FTC rules and guidelines, be advised that some links shared via my G+ post stream  (or at my websites and blogs) might contain affiliate referral links which means commissions might be earned if product sales resulted from your click-through to the vendor’s website.