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Showing posts with label world cuisine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label world cuisine. Show all posts

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Do You Heart Pomegranates?

Do you love pomegranates? I know I do! I would even like to start a movement with the goal of adding pomegranates to the traditional American Thanksgiving cornucopia. (Care to participate in the Thanksgiving cornucopia POLL and cast your vote? )




Pomegranates are so exotic and enjoy an exotic history!   Indeed it is the food of myth and legends.

They are the wonder food of ancient civilizations like Persia and Israel.  

In fact, in ancient Greece, pomegranates were considered an aphrodisiac.  

Two respected modern publications - The Globe and Mail, “Canada’s #1 national newspaper” and The NHS in England – both claim that the claims that pomegranates are a “super food” can be proven.













Shared the link via my post stream on Google Plus stream, but in case you didn't see it there, view it here. If you are on Pinterest, please visit my pinboard dedicated to POMEGRANATES? Started the board a couple of years ago and to date it has 100 pins: recipes (food and drinks), beauty and healthcare products, etc. 










 Blueberry Pomegranate - $5.00
Our Blueberry Pomegranate tea has a round fruity taste with a sweet and slightly tart finish. A wonderfully refreshing treat, perfect for any occasion! Floral, Sweet, Fruity

 Green Pomegranate - Award Winning - $5.00
Select organic green tea hand tossed in a large wok, dried to perfection, then carefully blended with organic raspberries and essence of pomegranate. Sweeten the senses with a tart and tangy rush to the palate. Also available in our Eco Pyramid Teabags here. Fruity, Sweet, Tart


Pomegranate juice in glass and pomegranates  on white
© Photographer: Svetamart | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Saturday, October 7, 2017

World Cuisine : Potatoes or Rice? Rice! It Has Jewels!!

Potatoes are wonderful food.  There is no limit to the recipes for preparing them.  But if one were to ask me about rice.  I would say the same thing.  If someone were to ask me to choose between a potato dish and a rice dish, I would have to go with this rice dish.  How could I resist?  It so pretty and exotic!  Plus.  It has jewels!


Persian Jeweled Rice is a spectacular rice pilaf topped with colorful gem-like fruits and nuts ~ this popular wedding dish is a celebration in itself!




More rice dishes you'll love just as much!

This rice dish has cranberries is a perfect American Thanksgiving side dish. Don't you think so?

PERSIAN CRANBERRY RICE PILAF | littlespicejar.com








Rosh Hashanah Sweet Basmati Rice with Carrots & Raisins | mayihavethatrecipe.com




Your Kids Are Going To LOVE These 4 Fried Rice Ideas | buzzfeed.com

Friday, October 6, 2017

Foodie Friday ~ Sampling Fast Food World Cuisine is a Fun Do!

Found this site called Delhi-Fun-Dos. As you probably guessed by the name, it's about fun things you can do in Delhi. Well, I know that the likelihood that I will ever travel to India is somewhere on my life's timeline between “slim chance” and "never gonna happen!"
But we can all travel the world online via the worldwide web and so I visited Delhi and guess what I found?  Wendys!!

My behavior is so typical American.   Right?  Travel around the world and what do we look for when we land in another country?  Same thing we have back home.  Duh!
Not true of me.  I really do want to experience the life and culture of the people in a land different my own.  But as soon as I got to site I saw the article about Wendys.  Couldn't help it!  I was curious!
We only have a bazillion Wendys fast food restaurants in America but saw the link and had to take a peek!   I'm thinking:

Wendys is on a “Fun Do List” of things to do in Delhi?

So I read the article and now I'm upset! I'm upset because we don't Paneer delight in our Wendys restaurants here in Texas.

I think every once in a while, our restaurants should offer, even if for “for a limited time only”, a taste of a popular dish from another country.

It's a great way to encourage food diversity and an appreciation for world cuisine and global flavors.
What do you think?
Is this idea doable?

Sampling global flavors is undeniably a great fun do! :)

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Reference:
Delhifundos. "Wendys – Delicious Burgers and More…." DelhiFunDoscom. N.p., 21 Jan. 2017. Web. 26 Jan. 2017. ( http://delhi-fun-dos.com/wendys-delicious-burgers-and-more/ ).
Image credit for Wendys logo:  By http://www.wendys.com/fr-ca/food/nutrition.pdf, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38723049
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Previous #FoodieFriday posts?


Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Mystery of the Perfect Condiments

For several years we've been adjusting, changing, modifying our diet. "We" meaning my significant other and me. Had you asked me 40 years ago about “veggie burgers”, I probably would have tried to pretend not to hear the question or act like you're weren't talking to me.

However, beginning in 2015, this is my reality check.

Veggie burgers are a real part of our nutrition plan.

Learned something about myself. Veggie burgers taste pretty good to me! Not all of them. But there is one particular brand that is inexpensive and tasty: Morningstar Farms® Garden Veggie Patties™. They have a variety of flavors: Asian, Spicy Black Bean, Mushroom, Grillers, etc. You eat them just like a regular hamburger.

(This is not affiliate advertisement.  I just like the brand.)
Made an amazing discovery. It sort of makes me feel silly because of its obviousness.
The Garden Veggie Pattie is the one that tastes the best in my opinion.  You don't have to dress it up with condiments. You don't even need to put it on a bun.
But the other ones – the mushroom, the Asian-style, the spicy bean, the chik'n or turkey grillers, etc. - are not so flavorful.  So I avoid them.
One of my daughters fixed a spicy bean burger for lunch but didn't finish the sandwich. She asked me if I wanted her leftovers; otherwise, she'd have to throw it away.
Waste food?!! Not in my house!!
So I ate what was left of her sandwich and … and … It tasted great!
Do you know why?
She put mustard and ketchup on her burger.
Duh! (O.o) That's what was missing from those veggie burgers??
The two most common under-appreciated condiments that are in homes and restaurants gave the veggie burger what it was missing. Flavor!
Why didn't I think of that??!  :)
◊◊◊◊
Marshman, Victoria. "The History of Mustard.The Nibble. Lifestyle Direct, Inc., July 2009. Web. 15 Apr 2017. © Copyright 2005-2017
Wiggins, Jasmine. "How Was Ketchup Invented?National Geographic: About The Plate. National Geographic Society., 21 Apr. 2014. Web. 05 May 2015.
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Content also appears at Persona Paper.
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Asked this question on a social site ~ Do You Have a Favorite Condiment for Your Food? ~ and got a wide range of responses that went way beyond mustard and ketchup. People started throwing out: salsa, soy sauce, barbecue sauce, different kinds of mustards, chutney, mint sauce, red currant jelly, pickles and paprika, garlic and chives, Chimichurri, fish sauce and shrimp paste, Thai chili, black vinegar and peri-peri.  Talk about food diversity!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

World Cuisine: Food History: Cuban Sandwich

Most people, most people in or from South Florida, have heard of Little Havana, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida, built up by Cuban immigrants who fled Cuba when Fidel Castro came to power. Everbody knows this is the place to go to partake of authentic Cuban cuisine. However, did you know that the oldest Cuban sandwich shop which opened its doors in 1947, is not located in Miami? The famous Silver Ring Cafe is in Tampa, Florida.




That was news to me. Also learned something else new. Very familiar with the Sandwich Cubano (Cuban sandwich) and Media Noche Sandwich (Midnight Sandwich); but did you know there are several variations of this sandwich? No doubt they’re all delicious! There is a third one called Elena Ruz (Cuban Turkey Sandwich). It has guava jelly as one of the ingredients. If you’ve never tried Cuban food, you must try the Cuban Sandwich. Even the world-famous chef, Bobby Flay has his own variation.

Eating food is one of life’s greatest joys. 
But learning food history is also great fun too!




* * * My original content. Published first at dailytwocents.com on November 29, 2016. ( http://dailytwocents.com/food-history-cuban-sandwich/ )


References:

Internetwriter62. "The Art of the Cuban Sandwich." HUBPages.com. HUBPages Inc., 17 Sept. 2013. Web. 20 Jan. 2017. 

Bobby Flay Goes Cuban.” CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 1 Feb. 2007. Web. 27 Mar. 2015.  (Video.)






Cuban Sandwiches - Gourmet Frozen Pork Appetizers (45 Piece Tray)





The Beginner's Cuban Cookbook: An Easy Guide to Making Authentic Cuban Food for Novice Chefs



Iberia Guava Paste (14 oz Bricks) 3 Pack

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Can You Name 5 British Desserts? (NO Googling!)

My youngest child is practicing (and hopefully improving) her writing skills. She picked a random topic and did some research.  The topic was British desserts, subject matter which she definitely had to find out about on her own because:

(A) Her American mother was clueless.
(B) Even though her father is from The Bahamas - which at one time was beholden to the Queen of England - Bahamian food is in no way a reflection of British cuisine.  In other words, he was also clueless.


(Arctic Roll)


Was pleasantly surprised with the results of her search.
Has anybody ever tried any of these treats?
Can you name 5 more British desserts?
(Supplied a link below if you can't think of any.)
  1. Arctic Roll
  2. Bakewell Tart
  3. Eton Mess
  4. Flies Graveyard
  5. Rock Cake
Flies Graveyard?? Sounds perfect for celebrating Halloween.


Content republished from British Desserts - Persona Paper, Oct. 5, 2015.





Five Exotic Spices by Melisa Marzett

Even though many herbs and spices are now readily available in local grocery stores all around the world or can easily be purchased online, most of us don't know know the history of these marvelous cooking ingredients and which country is responsible for introducing these exciting flavors to the global community.  Sharing a brief introduction to five (5) exotic spices:

SPICE Spotlight: Juniper Berries

http://everydayspices.webs.com/apps/blog/show/6664512-spice-spotlight-juniper-berries


1. Asafetida. This is an Asian spice made from the roots of certain species of Ferula. It is a gum-like spice with a very strong and unpleasant smell.  Actually, the name of the spice has a Latin origin, which means “evil-smelling gum”.  Asafetida is common in Indian vegetarian cuisine and is often the main ingredient in rice and bean dishes. Additionally, it has a wide range of medicinal properties and is beneficial for people with digestive disorders, high cholesterol, and/or nervous disorders.  Asafetida is rich in minerals and nutrients, such as iron, calcium, phosphorus, and protein.  Although most chefs and cooks rarely prepare a dish without onion and garlic, some people do not eat onion or garlic.  Certain people are allergic to onions and for some people, garlic causes extreme heart burn.  Asafetida is an ideal spice for those people.  In fact, its smell is similar to both onion and garlic.






2. Dried Avocado Leaves.  This spice (or herb) originated in Mexico. It is one of the most popular spices in Mexican cuisine.  Avocado leaves have an aniseed fragrance; however, these dried leaves are odorless and have a pungent taste. Dried avocado leaves are added to bean or meat dishes. Regarding health benefits, they are useful for people who have kidney stones and hypertension. Noteworthy:  Only certain varieties of avocado leaves are to be used in cooking or for medicinal purposes because some kinds of avocado leaves can contain toxic substances.

Additional References:

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredientby Victoria ChallancinLove at First Bite. Like any motivated foodie, I almost made myself sick sampling, musing, and guessing what unknown ingredient I was tasting in what appeared to be an ordinary black bean dip.


3. Epazote. This is another essential spice used in Mexican cuisine. Its extraordinary (or strange) scent can be described as a combination of kerosene, mint, and citrus. Epazote is made from the leaves of Mexican herb called dysphania ambrosioides (aka "Mexican tea").  It is used with bean and meat dishes. Additionally, it can be used in soups.

Additional Reading and Recipes:




4. Grains of Paradise. This delicious spice is an integral part of West African cuisine. It is obtained from a flower called Aframomum melegueta. Africans believed that this flower grew in Eden. Grains of paradise look like seeds and have jasmine, citrus, and hazelnut odor. It can be added to meat, fish, and potato dishes.

Link of Interest:
Find spices ordered according to the region:
GEOGRAPHIC SPICE INDEX


Ras El Hanout (4.0 Oz) By Zamouri Spices

Ingredients include over 30 different herbs and spices, such as: 

 Grains of Paradise, Lavender, turmeric, ajawan seeds, kalajeera, ginger, galangal, oris root, rose buds, monk's pepper, cinnamon and more!



5. Juniper Berries. Actually, juniper berries are more likely to be cones than berries. It has the smell of fir and is used for cooking meat dishes, especially stewed rabbit or beef. These “berries” grow on the juniper tree, are common throughout Europe,  included in ancient Greek recipes, and have been found in the Egyptian pyramids.  A wide range of German traditional dishes are cooked with juniper berries.



♦  Hope you enjoyed this intro.
About the writer:  Melisa Marzett works for: bigpaperwriter.com.  She does excellent research and can pen articles and supply blog publishers or website owners with quality content on almost any topic.  View the About tab on her Google+ profile for more samples of her work.



Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Let's Do Sushi! Keep It Kosher!

Determined to make your own sushi? The four ingredients listed below are considered the "basic sushi essentials".

  1. Gari, thinly sliced and pickled ginger.
  2. Wasabi, aka Japanese horseradish
  3. Nori, dried seaweed used to wrap the sushi roll
  4. Sushi rice, a Japanese rice that is sticky and short-grained.

Got these tips from Bani Grill. Great basic information to get started. But beyond this point? Uuuhh ... Let's go together.




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"Revolutionizing the way you eat sushi."

Starting with:
KOSHER SUSHI











Saturday, June 24, 2017

Spices in Filipino Cuisine by Carlo Villamayor (Guest Post)

It's no secret that Filipino cuisine is one of the best in the world, but like any good food, it has to have its secrets. Few people have really mastered authentic Filipino food, not the washed-down fare you get in fast foods and diners, but real, home-made native dishes. Although most of us can whip up something when we need to, it can be hard to capture that distinct Filipino taste.

So what really goes into our food? How do you make your food taste truly Filipino? There's really no single answer, because no one can define our food; we come from a hodgepodge of cultures, after all. But one thing that sets us apart from our Asian neighbors is our heavy use of spices. Whereas other cuisines prefer subtle hints of flavor, we like a big burst of it with every bite.

So that's the first rule: be generous with the spice. If you want your dish to fit in with other Filipino recipes, get to know the spices that go into them. Here are some of the most common.

Ginger

Ginger is used in most of Asian cuisine, and Filipino food recipes. In the Philippines, it is most commonly used in soups and stews; dishes such as arroz caldo (rice porridge), and tinola (chicken stew) use garlic as their main spice. It goes particularly well with chicken and fish dishes, where it provides a nice contrast to the strong meat flavors. Ginger is used both for flavor and aroma, although the flesh of the root is not always eaten. Most people just crush the root and drop it into the dish, then take it out just before serving.

Chili

We're not as wild about spicy food as the Thais, but we do like a bit of bite in our food. Virtually every Filipino dish can be spiced up with chili peppers, from rich meat viands to everyday soups and noodles. Sauces like patis (fish sauce) and soy sauce are often mixed with crushed chili and used as dips or marinades. Bicol, a region in southeastern Luzon, is known for using chili peppers in most of its dishes. Perhaps the most popular is Bicol express, made with meat, bagoong (saut'ed shrimp paste), coconut milk, and chopped green chilies.

Garlic and onions

These two almost always go together, especially in meat and vegetable dishes. You may be more familiar with Taiwanese and Australian garlic, which have larger cloves and are easier to work with. But if you want a stronger, spicier flavor, go for native garlic. Philippine garlic comes in smaller bulbs, with cloves less than half the size of other types. This makes them hard to handle, but it's well worth the trouble.

Philippine onions are strong and pungent, making them a great source of flavor. Use native red onions for saut'ing and pickling, but use the white ones for salads and sandwiches. If you're making rice porridge, top it with chopped green onions for extra spice.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass has strong-smelling leaves and stalks commonly used in soups, teas and sauces. The leaf is slightly sweet with a hint of citrus, a perfect complement to gravy and other meat sauces. There are several ways to use lemongrass, but the most common method is cooking the fresh leaves (sometimes the entire stalk or bulb) with the food to release the flavor. If you're using the stalk, take only the soft inner part and chop it up before dropping it in. You can also use dried and powdered lemongrass, especially if you're in the city and fresh leaves are hard to find. 




Pandan

Pandan is mostly an aromatic ingredient, most commonly used with plain white rice. Just add a couple of leaves to your rice as it boils, and it comes out with a strong, inviting aroma. Some regions even weave it onto rice pots for an even stronger scent. You can do the same with rice cakes, puddings, and other Filipino desserts recipes.

Bay leaf

The strong, pungent taste of bay leaves makes them a perfect fit for Filipino cooking recipes. The leaf has a wide range of uses, from meat sauces and dips to main dishes like adobo, menudo and mechado. Dried bay leaves are traditionally used; fresh bay is seldom available in local markets. The leaf itself is not usually eaten; like ginger, you can take out the leaves once you're ready to serve. However, most people just leave them in and set them aside when eating.



About The Author:  
Carlo Villamayor is a devoted cook, he makes it his personal mission to spread the joy of one of his Filipino food recipes with food lovers the world over. Bon appetit!  (Source:  ArticleCity.com)




EES shares recipes, cooking tips
and all things foodie!

 




Thursday, June 15, 2017

I'd Like to Order Kung Pao Chicken Smothered with Melted Cheese! (Yuk!)

A few years back, I was having a spirited discussion with co-workers at one of my temp jobs and the discussion turned to food preferences. Mexican versus Chinese.

I said: “I love Chinese food!”

My co-worker's response was:
“No way! Chinese food doesn't have near enough cheese for me!!”

I laughed and thought to myself: 'Yep! She's right about that!'

But why? ⍰
Why is there hardly any cheese in Chinese cuisine?

Did some research. Here is the quick answer, according to Corinne Trang, affectionately referred to by her many admirers as the “Asian Julia Child”. She says: “In Asian food culture, you have thousands, countless amounts of herbs and spices that we use at any given time. So few of these spices go well with cheese.”

Nevertheless, there is a food trend going in the “fusion” direction and chefs are experimenting with incorporating cheese into Asian recipes.

I seriously doubt that you can order a plate of kung pao chicken smothered with melted cheese.  I didn't say the chefs had taken leave of their senses.  😋

But what do you think of this "adaptation"?

Do you like your Chinese food with or without cheese?

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Quote Source:
Kuo, Stephanie. "The Real Reason There's No Cheese In Asian Cuisine." CheeseRank : Your Go To Guide for All Things Cheese. N.p., 28 July 2014. Web. 15 June 2017.



Cheese in Chinese Cuisine

How many authentic (ie., not fusion) Chinese dishes use, or incorporate, cheese? When I say cheese, I mean actual cheese -- either from a cow, goat or whatnot. What I don't mean is "Chinese cheese" or fermented, preserved tofu. The only Chinese dish I can think of that has cheese is Yunnan Goat Cheese, served sprinkled with sugar and pepper.

It Turns Out, There is Such a Thing as Chinese Cheese

The Blog: Cookbook author and teacher Diana Kuan writes about traditional and modern takes on Asian home cooking on her blog, Appetite for China. She has also recently launched an online shop called Plate and Pencil, with cute gifts like a "Dumplings Around the World" tote bag.

Discovering Cheese in One of the Most Unsuspecting Places

It's nearly impossible for any Westerners to remember the first time they tried cheese. From pizza to pasta to hunks eaten on their own, cheese's ubiquity in our diets means that we've been enjoying it since before we could eat most other solid foods. For Liu Yang, a cheesemaker in Beijing, the o...

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