Showing posts with label world cuisine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label world cuisine. Show all posts

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Spices in Filipino Cuisine by Carlo Villamayor (Guest Post)

It's no secret that Filipino cuisine is one of the best in the world, but like any good food, it has to have its secrets. Few people have really mastered authentic Filipino food, not the washed-down fare you get in fast foods and diners, but real, home-made native dishes. Although most of us can whip up something when we need to, it can be hard to capture that distinct Filipino taste.

So what really goes into our food? How do you make your food taste truly Filipino? There's really no single answer, because no one can define our food; we come from a hodgepodge of cultures, after all. But one thing that sets us apart from our Asian neighbors is our heavy use of spices. Whereas other cuisines prefer subtle hints of flavor, we like a big burst of it with every bite.

So that's the first rule: be generous with the spice. If you want your dish to fit in with other Filipino recipes, get to know the spices that go into them. Here are some of the most common.

Ginger

Ginger is used in most of Asian cuisine, and Filipino food recipes. In the Philippines, it is most commonly used in soups and stews; dishes such as arroz caldo (rice porridge), and tinola (chicken stew) use garlic as their main spice. It goes particularly well with chicken and fish dishes, where it provides a nice contrast to the strong meat flavors. Ginger is used both for flavor and aroma, although the flesh of the root is not always eaten. Most people just crush the root and drop it into the dish, then take it out just before serving.

Chili

We're not as wild about spicy food as the Thais, but we do like a bit of bite in our food. Virtually every Filipino dish can be spiced up with chili peppers, from rich meat viands to everyday soups and noodles. Sauces like patis (fish sauce) and soy sauce are often mixed with crushed chili and used as dips or marinades. Bicol, a region in southeastern Luzon, is known for using chili peppers in most of its dishes. Perhaps the most popular is Bicol express, made with meat, bagoong (saut'ed shrimp paste), coconut milk, and chopped green chilies.

Garlic and onions

These two almost always go together, especially in meat and vegetable dishes. You may be more familiar with Taiwanese and Australian garlic, which have larger cloves and are easier to work with. But if you want a stronger, spicier flavor, go for native garlic. Philippine garlic comes in smaller bulbs, with cloves less than half the size of other types. This makes them hard to handle, but it's well worth the trouble.

Philippine onions are strong and pungent, making them a great source of flavor. Use native red onions for saut'ing and pickling, but use the white ones for salads and sandwiches. If you're making rice porridge, top it with chopped green onions for extra spice.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass has strong-smelling leaves and stalks commonly used in soups, teas and sauces. The leaf is slightly sweet with a hint of citrus, a perfect complement to gravy and other meat sauces. There are several ways to use lemongrass, but the most common method is cooking the fresh leaves (sometimes the entire stalk or bulb) with the food to release the flavor. If you're using the stalk, take only the soft inner part and chop it up before dropping it in. You can also use dried and powdered lemongrass, especially if you're in the city and fresh leaves are hard to find. 




Pandan

Pandan is mostly an aromatic ingredient, most commonly used with plain white rice. Just add a couple of leaves to your rice as it boils, and it comes out with a strong, inviting aroma. Some regions even weave it onto rice pots for an even stronger scent. You can do the same with rice cakes, puddings, and other Filipino desserts recipes.

Bay leaf

The strong, pungent taste of bay leaves makes them a perfect fit for Filipino cooking recipes. The leaf has a wide range of uses, from meat sauces and dips to main dishes like adobo, menudo and mechado. Dried bay leaves are traditionally used; fresh bay is seldom available in local markets. The leaf itself is not usually eaten; like ginger, you can take out the leaves once you're ready to serve. However, most people just leave them in and set them aside when eating.



About The Author:  
Carlo Villamayor is a devoted cook, he makes it his personal mission to spread the joy of one of his Filipino food recipes with food lovers the world over. Bon appetit!  (Source:  ArticleCity.com)




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Thursday, June 15, 2017

I'd Like to Order Kung Pao Chicken Smothered with Melted Cheese! (Yuk!)

A few years back, I was having a spirited discussion with co-workers at one of my temp jobs and the discussion turned to food preferences. Mexican versus Chinese.

I said: “I love Chinese food!”

My co-worker's response was:
“No way! Chinese food doesn't have near enough cheese for me!!”

I laughed and thought to myself: 'Yep! She's right about that!'

But why? ⍰
Why is there hardly any cheese in Chinese cuisine?

Did some research. Here is the quick answer, according to Corinne Trang, affectionately referred to by her many admirers as the “Asian Julia Child”. She says: “In Asian food culture, you have thousands, countless amounts of herbs and spices that we use at any given time. So few of these spices go well with cheese.”

Nevertheless, there is a food trend going in the “fusion” direction and chefs are experimenting with incorporating cheese into Asian recipes.

I seriously doubt that you can order a plate of kung pao chicken smothered with melted cheese.  I didn't say the chefs had taken leave of their senses.  😋

But what do you think of this "adaptation"?

Do you like your Chinese food with or without cheese?

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Quote Source:
Kuo, Stephanie. "The Real Reason There's No Cheese In Asian Cuisine." CheeseRank : Your Go To Guide for All Things Cheese. N.p., 28 July 2014. Web. 15 June 2017.



Cheese in Chinese Cuisine

How many authentic (ie., not fusion) Chinese dishes use, or incorporate, cheese? When I say cheese, I mean actual cheese -- either from a cow, goat or whatnot. What I don't mean is "Chinese cheese" or fermented, preserved tofu. The only Chinese dish I can think of that has cheese is Yunnan Goat Cheese, served sprinkled with sugar and pepper.

It Turns Out, There is Such a Thing as Chinese Cheese

The Blog: Cookbook author and teacher Diana Kuan writes about traditional and modern takes on Asian home cooking on her blog, Appetite for China. She has also recently launched an online shop called Plate and Pencil, with cute gifts like a "Dumplings Around the World" tote bag.

Discovering Cheese in One of the Most Unsuspecting Places

It's nearly impossible for any Westerners to remember the first time they tried cheese. From pizza to pasta to hunks eaten on their own, cheese's ubiquity in our diets means that we've been enjoying it since before we could eat most other solid foods. For Liu Yang, a cheesemaker in Beijing, the o...

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Friday, June 2, 2017

Foodie Friday : World Cuisine : Japan’s 10 weirdest ice cream flavors (Reblog)

ATTN Foodies and  food lovers. Check out this Top Ten List. Do you have a taste for something sweet, cold and delicious, yet strange and exotic or ... maybe just a little salty? Then you should probably be visiting an ice cream parlor in Japan. Have heard of sweet potato ice cream, which I thought was weird; but it's not on this list! Squid ink?? It's Number 8. Eh! It's soft serve! Worth a try! :)







Previous #FoodieFriday posts?


Saturday, May 27, 2017

One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian

A general review of the History of the Exotic Spice Trade will eventually lead to Indonesia.

"One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian
  • During the years 1602 to 1942, what is now the Republic of Indonesia was a Dutch colony. ... The tradition of Indonesian food known today as Rijstafel, which means Rice Table, was started by the Dutch. ..."

Read more at: Indonesian Food History – Rijistafel | Daily Two Cents

"Rijsttafel" by Jan Willem van Wessel from Rotterdam, Netherlands - Rijsttafel 13. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.





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Can you write short posts - approximately 200 words - about a topic? 
Earn Money For Publishing Short Posts at Daily Two Cents (dailytwocents.com).



Thursday, May 25, 2017

ATTN Food Bloggers! Niume Accepts Republished Content

Do you love food? Need a place to share the love? Do you have old blog posts you would like to re-purpose and republish?  Niume.com is looking for contributors to their Food Sphere. Below is an example of a few of my contributions ("newbie") and articles submitted by experienced food bloggers.

Food History: Cuban Sandwich | Niume | Food Sphere



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    The Beginner's Cuban Cookbook: An Easy Guide to Making Authentic Cuban Food for Novice Chefs



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    BLOGGING OPPORTUNITIES: Sites That Accept Republished Content
    • Niume is a collaborative blogging platform with multiple spheres (or topics).  The Food Spere is just one.  But if you are a food blogger you are encouraged to share your content.  This is site accepts republished content and allows you to promote your blog.  Create a free account and start immediately.  Click the button that says "Create a Post" and a quick form will pop up.  Must have a valid eMail address. 
    • Sign Up 

    Wednesday, May 24, 2017

    Which Cultures Make the Best Cakes?

    Which Cultures Make the Best Cakes? My husband says when it comes to baking, nobody beats out the Greeks and the Jews. We all have our preferences and there is not one person in the world who can say that their specific food tastes is “the right food taste”.

    Take me for example. I grew up using Betty Crocker and Duncan Hines cake mixes. The first time I ever ate a piece of cake made from scratch, my mouth didn't know what had happened. It was the mostest bestest softest wonderfullest piece of loving joy ever!  Cake is love!

    Needless to say cake baking is not my forte. But I do love a great cake. It would be right to say that cake loving IS my forte.  💗

    Honestly! If Queen Marie Antoinette had really said “Let them eat cake!” and I had been in earshot distance, I would have been “Where?!! Where??!! Where's the cake??!!”



    Recently, I've been coming across recipes shared by my online friends from different countries and also from food newsletters that I subscribe to and it's got me dreaming and wishing I could enjoy all of these wonderful baked delights without having to concern myself with the possible ill effects of consuming too much sugar. Alas! There is diabetes in my family line and I just don't want to take any chances.

    Most of the time, I enjoy cakes by just looking at them or maybe taste a teeny weeny sample. ☺

    But some cakes are far too pretty and unusual to eat. Don't you think?  Like these incredible jelly cakes.




    Stunning Edible Flower Jelly Cakes Blooming in Your Plate

    These gorgeous jelly cakes came from 'La Floraison' in Sydney Australia. Like a Japanese rainbow cake these confections are almost too pretty to eat.



    http://k-kyeopta-blog.tumblr.com/post/36270226635

    Some cakes are not even cakes. They're masterpieces. Works of art!



    And then some cakes are dummy cakes. Dummy cakes? Yeah. New term I learned when I found a wedding cake by LeNovelle Cake that somebody shared via the Google Plus social network. Below is a photo of the most extraordinary dummy wedding cake I've ever seen.



    What about you? Do you 💗 cake?




    While you're still here, please visit these pages ...