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Showing posts with label Asian cuisine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Asian cuisine. Show all posts

Thursday, June 15, 2017

I'd Like to Order Kung Pao Chicken Smothered with Melted Cheese! (Yuk!)

A few years back, I was having a spirited discussion with co-workers at one of my temp jobs and the discussion turned to food preferences. Mexican versus Chinese.

I said: “I love Chinese food!”

My co-worker's response was:
“No way! Chinese food doesn't have near enough cheese for me!!”

I laughed and thought to myself: 'Yep! She's right about that!'

But why? ⍰
Why is there hardly any cheese in Chinese cuisine?

Did some research. Here is the quick answer, according to Corinne Trang, affectionately referred to by her many admirers as the “Asian Julia Child”. She says: “In Asian food culture, you have thousands, countless amounts of herbs and spices that we use at any given time. So few of these spices go well with cheese.”

Nevertheless, there is a food trend going in the “fusion” direction and chefs are experimenting with incorporating cheese into Asian recipes.

I seriously doubt that you can order a plate of kung pao chicken smothered with melted cheese.  I didn't say the chefs had taken leave of their senses.  😋

But what do you think of this "adaptation"?

Do you like your Chinese food with or without cheese?

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Quote Source:
Kuo, Stephanie. "The Real Reason There's No Cheese In Asian Cuisine." CheeseRank : Your Go To Guide for All Things Cheese. N.p., 28 July 2014. Web. 15 June 2017.



Cheese in Chinese Cuisine

How many authentic (ie., not fusion) Chinese dishes use, or incorporate, cheese? When I say cheese, I mean actual cheese -- either from a cow, goat or whatnot. What I don't mean is "Chinese cheese" or fermented, preserved tofu. The only Chinese dish I can think of that has cheese is Yunnan Goat Cheese, served sprinkled with sugar and pepper.

It Turns Out, There is Such a Thing as Chinese Cheese

The Blog: Cookbook author and teacher Diana Kuan writes about traditional and modern takes on Asian home cooking on her blog, Appetite for China. She has also recently launched an online shop called Plate and Pencil, with cute gifts like a "Dumplings Around the World" tote bag.

Discovering Cheese in One of the Most Unsuspecting Places

It's nearly impossible for any Westerners to remember the first time they tried cheese. From pizza to pasta to hunks eaten on their own, cheese's ubiquity in our diets means that we've been enjoying it since before we could eat most other solid foods. For Liu Yang, a cheesemaker in Beijing, the o...

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Friday, April 21, 2017

Foodie Friday : Cool Foodies and Food Lovers Celebrating Their “Firsts” on Twitter

Happy Friday! (It's FoodieFriday!)  Always searching for like-minded food lovers and found people celebrating their “firsts”. First food blog post. First food article accepted at a major site. Etc. Here are their tweets. Interesting variation. French food; Health / Energy Food tips; Asian food; Vegan recipes; and Food Photography.  

Wish them continued success!











































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Monday, January 9, 2017

Pork Lo Mein - Make Takeout at Home | The Desert Cook (Reblog)

Fellow food blogger Candy Dorsey publishes her own blog and also food-related Wizzley pages (see widget below). Reblogging / sharing the link to her post about pork lo mein. Not only is the dish delicious and easy to make but did you know that for the Chinese people, noodles are a “symbol of longevity”.  For those who celebrate, Chinese New Year, for 2017 it occurs on January 28th.  Candy also has a recipe for Chinese New Year Balls, which I'm sharing as well.

Wishing you peace, prosperity, good health and a long and wonderful life!



Pork Lo Mein - Make Takeout at Home |
The Desert Cook




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Chinese New Year Balls


Chinese New Year Balls

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour 1/4 cup sugar 2 tsp. baking powder dash of salt Combine all dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a separate bowl stir together all wet ingredients. Add to flour mixture all at once and stir just till moistened. Heat about 2" of cooking oil in a deep pot.



Candy's Recipes on Wizzley!






Saturday, December 24, 2016

Five Exotic Spices (Guest Post)

Even though many herbs and spices are now readily available in local grocery stores all around the world or can easily be purchased online, most of us don't know know the history of these marvelous cooking ingredients and which country is responsible for introducing these exciting flavors to the global community.  Sharing a brief introduction to five (5) exotic spices:

SPICE Spotlight: Juniper Berries

http://everydayspices.webs.com/apps/blog/show/6664512-spice-spotlight-juniper-berries


1. Asafetida. This is an Asian spice made from the roots of certain species of Ferula. It is a gum-like spice with a very strong and unpleasant smell.  Actually, the name of the spice has a Latin origin, which means “evil-smelling gum”.  Asafetida is common in Indian vegetarian cuisine and is often a main ingredient in rice and bean dishes. Additionally, it has a wide range of medicinal properties and is beneficial for people with digestive disorders, high cholesterol, and/or nervous disorders.  Asafetida is rich in minerals and nutrients, such as iron, calcium, phosphorus, and protein.  Although most chefs and cooks rarely prepare a dish without onion and garlic, some people do not eat onion or garlic.  Certain people are allergic to onions and for some people garlic causes extreme heart burn.  Asafetida is an ideal spice for those people.  In fact, its smell is similar to both onion and garlic.






2. Dried Avocado Leaves.  This spice (or herb) originated in Mexico. It is one of the most popular spices in Mexican cuisine.  Avocado leaves have an aniseed fragrance; however, these dried leaves are odorless and have pungent taste. Dried avocado leaves are added to bean or meat dishes. Regarding health benefits, they are useful for people who have kidney stones and hypertension. Noteworthy:  Only certain varieties of avocado leaves are to be used in cooking or for medicinal purposes because some kinds of avocado leaves can contain toxic substances.

Additional References:

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredient

Avocado Leaves: A Secret Mexican Ingredientby Victoria ChallancinLove at First Bite. Like any motivated foodie, I almost made myself sick sampling, musing, and guessing what unknown ingredient I was tasting in what appeared to be an ordinary black bean dip.


3. Epazote. This is another essential spice used in Mexican cuisine. Its extraordinary (or strange) scent can be described as a combination of kerosene, mint, and citrus. Epazote is made from the leaves of Mexican herb called dysphania ambrosioides (aka "Mexican tea").  It is used with bean and meat dishes. Additionally, it can be used in soups.

Additional Reading and Recipes:




4. Grains of Paradise. This delicious spice is an integral part of West African cuisine. It is obtained from flower called Aframomum melegueta. Africans believed that this flower grew in Eden. Grains of paradise look like seeds and have jasmine, citrus, and hazelnut odor. It can be added to meat, fish, and potato dishes.

Link of Interest:
Find spices ordered according to the region:
GEOGRAPHIC SPICE INDEX


Ras El Hanout (4.0 Oz) By Zamouri Spices

Ingredients include over 30 different herbs and spices, such as: 

 Grains of Paradise, Lavender, turmeric, ajawan seeds, kalajeera, ginger, galangal, oris root, rose buds, monk's pepper, cinnamon and more!



5. Juniper Berries. Actually, juniper berries are more likely to be cones than berries. It has the smell of fir and is used for cooking meat dishes, especially stewed rabbit or beef. These “berries” grow on the juniper tree, are common throughout Europe,  included in ancient Greek recipes, and have been found in the Egyptian pyramids.  A wide range of German traditional dishes are cooked with juniper berries.



♦  Hope you enjoyed this intro.
About the writer:  Melisa Marzett works for: bigpaperwriter.com.  She does excellent research and can pen articles and supply blog publishers or website owners with quality content on almost any topic.  View the About tab on her Google+ profile for more samples of her work.



Monday, November 21, 2016

Let's Bake & Cook : Mango Fried Rice (Reblog)

Have a friend who is very active in several online communities and made a mental note to publish a blog post sharing many of her wonderful recipes she publishes all over the Internet. Her collection is impressive. Maybe one day she will publish a cookbook! This is my Shout Out to Peach Purple, fellow blogger and freelance writer. Beginning with a link back her food blog she publishes via Blogspot.  Mango is my favorite fruit and I love fried rice!  :)

Let's Bake & Cook : Mango Fried Rice



You can also view her recipes at HUBPages.  Here is one you may find intriguing.  Did you know you can make a cake in a rice cooker?






Peach Purple has four food blogs published via the BlogJob blogging community.  Here are samples from each one.  The name of the blog is in parentheses.






LiteracyBase is where she has been sharing her tasty recipes lately and I'm loving it!  You'll love them too!  :)


 

Chicken Gumbo Recipe


Chicken Gumbo Recipe - LiteracyBase

Have you heard of Chicken Gumbo? I didn't know that this chicken recipe is a well known dish in USA since the 18th century. One of my Facefriend had recommended me to try out her Chicken Gumbo recipe which she had uploaded online. I found it a very exceptional exquisite recipe, all-in-1 chicken stew that ...


Mustard Green Soup with Meat Balls


Mustard Green Soup with Meat Balls - LiteracyBase

If you had ever tasted Cai Xin soup, you should get acquainted with his green leafy vegetable today because you are going to love it as much as I do! What is Cai Xin Mustard Greens is fondly known as "Cai Xin" among the Chinese community.


Best Chicken Rice: Hainanese Chicken Rice


Best Chicken Rice: Hainanese Chicken Rice - LiteracyBase

Chicken Rice which is locally known as "Ji Fan " or "Sau Ji Fan" is a very popular main course meal that consist of roast chicken with steamed chicken rice and slices of cucumbers. There are 2 types of Chicken Rice sold in the restaurant; mainly: - Roast chicken -Hainanese chicken ( white ...


Homemade Prawn Dumpling Soup


Homemade Prawn Dumpling Soup - LiteracyBase

I started to fall in love with dumplings since my childhood days. Mom used to homemade dumplings which were large, fulled of generous fillings and super delicious soup. She always added generous heaps of mixed minced pork and 2 large tiger prawns for the dumpling fillings.


Chinese Soup: Tofu with Kelp Soup


Chinese Soup: Tofu with Kelp Soup - LiteracyBase

When I was young, mom used to make delicious Chinese soup for every day meal which is clear, not thick or brothy at all. Most of her Chinese soup was light, clear and comforting that soothes anyone who was losing appetite or sick over mild illness ( fever, cough, diarrhea, etc).


Rice Vermicelli Noodle Soup


Rice Vermicelli Noodle Soup - LiteracyBase

I simply LOVE my mother's Rice Vermicelli Noodle Soup, compare to my mother-in-law's version. The soup itself is tasty , even though she had used Knorr Chicken Cube Stock and the additional fried chicken fillets, crab sticks, scrambled eggs and cooked white cabbages were just FANTASTIC !



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