Have Fun Exploring This Blog and the Related Links We Share!

*

*

Follow
Showing posts with label Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Food. Show all posts

Friday, October 6, 2017

A Large Order of Jupiter Fries, Please!

Have been reading about the possibility of growing vegetables on other planets? Saw a preview of that movie which starred Matt Damon, “The Martian” (2015), where he was growing stuff in a place where nothing grows. I dismissed the notion because it was a science fiction movie. I mean … it's “fiction”. Not science.  :)

However, there are some scientists who are serious about pursuing this endeavor. Researchers want to and have been experimenting with plants growing in soil similar to kind of dirt one would find on Mars or Jupiter, for example.



*
As a non-scientist, I would not completely write off farming on Mars or Jupiter as an impossibility.  But I will say the scientists were very smart in choosing the potato as the test crop.  As my late non-scientist sister with a green thumb once told me: "If you can't grow a potato, you can't grow anything."  :)
According to a 2012 BBC News report, food futurologists are looking into the kind of food we may be eating in 20 years.  But they are only researching food available here on earth like insects, algae, lab-grown meat, and sonic-enhanced food (???).
Who knows? Fries from Jupiter might be quite tasty. :) But I bet they'll be expensive.  :)

* * *
References:
Flook, Jamie. "Could Foods Taste Better On Other Planets Than They Do On Earth?" Popular Science. A Bonnier Corporation Company, 22 Sept. 2015. Web. 8 Feb. 2017. ( http://www.popsci.com/could-food-taste-better-other-planets ).
Schneibel, Andrea. "SPACE: Scientists Try to Grow Peruvian Potatoes on "Mars"." Scientific American. A Division of Nature America, Inc., 2 Feb. 2016. Web. 8 Feb. 2017. ( https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-try-to-grow-peruvian-potatoes-on-mars/ ).
Jean-Louis, Lawrence. "Life on Mars? For Potatoes Maybe…." Cook, Mix, Mingle. N.p., 3 Feb. 2016. Web. 8 Feb. 2017. ( http://www.cookmixmingle.com/food-recipes/growing-potatoes-on-mars/ ).
Winterman, Denise. "Future Foods: What Will We Be Eating in 20 Years' Time?" BBC News Magazine. BBC News Services, 30 July 2012. Web. 08 Feb. 2017. ( http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-18813075 ).
♦ ♦ ♦


Sunday, October 1, 2017

Health : Control Your Appetite : It's All in Your Head

Another discovery has been made in the study of food, health, and science. Credit is being given to Professor Kazuyoshi Ukena of Hiroshima University for identifying NPGL, a protein in our brain which “apparently aims to maintain body mass at a constant, come feast or famine”.


The professor's finding eliminates the excuse of not being able to lose weight and stop yourself from overeating because you don't have any willpower because the mechanisms for appetite control are literally ... all in your head. :)


♦ ♦ ♦

More Interesting Links and Recommended Reading:

Frohlich, Thomas C. "25 Cities With the Healthiest Diets." 247wallst.com. AOL-HuffPost Money & Finance, 03 May 2017. Web. 09 May 2017.

Fox, Treathyl. "Do You Know What Gives You Energy?" My Shopping Channel. BlogJob.com, 06 May 2017. Web. 09 May 2017.

Kostyo, Mike. "Datassential: 15 Flavor Trends to Watch in 2017 and beyond." SmartBrief. N.p., 12 Dec. 2016. Web. 09 May 2017.



Insurance Mart and Insurance Smart shares general health info.
For general info purposes. Not to be substituted for medical advice.


Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Mystery of the Perfect Condiments

For several years we've been adjusting, changing, modifying our diet. "We" meaning my significant other and me. Had you asked me 40 years ago about “veggie burgers”, I probably would have tried to pretend not to hear the question or act like you're weren't talking to me.

However, beginning in 2015, this is my reality check.

Veggie burgers are a real part of our nutrition plan.

Learned something about myself. Veggie burgers taste pretty good to me! Not all of them. But there is one particular brand that is inexpensive and tasty: Morningstar Farms® Garden Veggie Patties™. They have a variety of flavors: Asian, Spicy Black Bean, Mushroom, Grillers, etc. You eat them just like a regular hamburger.

(This is not affiliate advertisement.  I just like the brand.)
Made an amazing discovery. It sort of makes me feel silly because of its obviousness.
The Garden Veggie Pattie is the one that tastes the best in my opinion.  You don't have to dress it up with condiments. You don't even need to put it on a bun.
But the other ones – the mushroom, the Asian-style, the spicy bean, the chik'n or turkey grillers, etc. - are not so flavorful.  So I avoid them.
One of my daughters fixed a spicy bean burger for lunch but didn't finish the sandwich. She asked me if I wanted her leftovers; otherwise, she'd have to throw it away.
Waste food?!! Not in my house!!
So I ate what was left of her sandwich and … and … It tasted great!
Do you know why?
She put mustard and ketchup on her burger.
Duh! (O.o) That's what was missing from those veggie burgers??
The two most common under-appreciated condiments that are in homes and restaurants gave the veggie burger what it was missing. Flavor!
Why didn't I think of that??!  :)
◊◊◊◊
Marshman, Victoria. "The History of Mustard.The Nibble. Lifestyle Direct, Inc., July 2009. Web. 15 Apr 2017. © Copyright 2005-2017
Wiggins, Jasmine. "How Was Ketchup Invented?National Geographic: About The Plate. National Geographic Society., 21 Apr. 2014. Web. 05 May 2015.
* * *
Content also appears at Persona Paper.
***
Asked this question on a social site ~ Do You Have a Favorite Condiment for Your Food? ~ and got a wide range of responses that went way beyond mustard and ketchup. People started throwing out: salsa, soy sauce, barbecue sauce, different kinds of mustards, chutney, mint sauce, red currant jelly, pickles and paprika, garlic and chives, Chimichurri, fish sauce and shrimp paste, Thai chili, black vinegar and peri-peri.  Talk about food diversity!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

World Cuisine: Food History: Cuban Sandwich

Most people, most people in or from South Florida, have heard of Little Havana, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida, built up by Cuban immigrants who fled Cuba when Fidel Castro came to power. Everbody knows this is the place to go to partake of authentic Cuban cuisine. However, did you know that the oldest Cuban sandwich shop which opened its doors in 1947, is not located in Miami? The famous Silver Ring Cafe is in Tampa, Florida.




That was news to me. Also learned something else new. Very familiar with the Sandwich Cubano (Cuban sandwich) and Media Noche Sandwich (Midnight Sandwich); but did you know there are several variations of this sandwich? No doubt they’re all delicious! There is a third one called Elena Ruz (Cuban Turkey Sandwich). It has guava jelly as one of the ingredients. If you’ve never tried Cuban food, you must try the Cuban Sandwich. Even the world-famous chef, Bobby Flay has his own variation.

Eating food is one of life’s greatest joys. 
But learning food history is also great fun too!




* * * My original content. Published first at dailytwocents.com on November 29, 2016. ( http://dailytwocents.com/food-history-cuban-sandwich/ )


References:

Internetwriter62. "The Art of the Cuban Sandwich." HUBPages.com. HUBPages Inc., 17 Sept. 2013. Web. 20 Jan. 2017. 

Bobby Flay Goes Cuban.” CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 1 Feb. 2007. Web. 27 Mar. 2015.  (Video.)






Cuban Sandwiches - Gourmet Frozen Pork Appetizers (45 Piece Tray)





The Beginner's Cuban Cookbook: An Easy Guide to Making Authentic Cuban Food for Novice Chefs



Iberia Guava Paste (14 oz Bricks) 3 Pack

Saturday, July 15, 2017

General Health Tips : 7 Best Foods for People Over 50

Life stages simplified:
  • Growth and development? Youth and adolescence.
  • Procreation and maintenance? Young adult – 20 something plus 30 years.
  • Disease prevention and keeping body systems working? Congratulations! You've reached the 50 and beyond mark!


What is an ideal anti-aging shopping list for someone 50 or over? 

 


1. Green Leafy Vegetables
  • fight DNA damage that may lead to cancer;
  • reduce your risk of chronic eye diseases;
  • suppress the amino acid homocysteine which is important for brain health.


2. Kefir or Yogurt
  • source of calcium, needed for bone;
  • choose plain, low-sugar varieties, ideally made from grass-fed milk.


3. Whey Protein
  • counteract loss of muscle mass and strength.
  • easily absorbed and supports muscle growth and repair.
  • add to smoothies or mix with milk for a quick shake.


4. Wild-Caught Seafood
  • best sources of omega-3 fats, fights inflammation and supports brain health, heart health and more.


5. Berries
  • high in fiber and antioxidants;
  • should be called “super berries” because of all the health benefits.


6. Olive Oil
  • heart-healthy monounsaturated fat can lower risk of heart disease;
  • controls insulin levels and blood sugar;
  • provides vitamins E and K.


7. Dark Chocolate (the darker, the better)
  • rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds
  • lowers risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even abdominal obesity;
  • satisfies your sweet tooth. :)




DISCLAIMER: Information above not intended to substitituted for medical advice. General information purposes only. If you found the summary above useful and would like to read the extended version of the article or find other health-related writings, click here to peruse the full library.









Lumen Naturals for Weight Loss

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Spices in Filipino Cuisine by Carlo Villamayor (Guest Post)

It's no secret that Filipino cuisine is one of the best in the world, but like any good food, it has to have its secrets. Few people have really mastered authentic Filipino food, not the washed-down fare you get in fast foods and diners, but real, home-made native dishes. Although most of us can whip up something when we need to, it can be hard to capture that distinct Filipino taste.

So what really goes into our food? How do you make your food taste truly Filipino? There's really no single answer, because no one can define our food; we come from a hodgepodge of cultures, after all. But one thing that sets us apart from our Asian neighbors is our heavy use of spices. Whereas other cuisines prefer subtle hints of flavor, we like a big burst of it with every bite.

So that's the first rule: be generous with the spice. If you want your dish to fit in with other Filipino recipes, get to know the spices that go into them. Here are some of the most common.

Ginger

Ginger is used in most of Asian cuisine, and Filipino food recipes. In the Philippines, it is most commonly used in soups and stews; dishes such as arroz caldo (rice porridge), and tinola (chicken stew) use garlic as their main spice. It goes particularly well with chicken and fish dishes, where it provides a nice contrast to the strong meat flavors. Ginger is used both for flavor and aroma, although the flesh of the root is not always eaten. Most people just crush the root and drop it into the dish, then take it out just before serving.

Chili

We're not as wild about spicy food as the Thais, but we do like a bit of bite in our food. Virtually every Filipino dish can be spiced up with chili peppers, from rich meat viands to everyday soups and noodles. Sauces like patis (fish sauce) and soy sauce are often mixed with crushed chili and used as dips or marinades. Bicol, a region in southeastern Luzon, is known for using chili peppers in most of its dishes. Perhaps the most popular is Bicol express, made with meat, bagoong (saut'ed shrimp paste), coconut milk, and chopped green chilies.

Garlic and onions

These two almost always go together, especially in meat and vegetable dishes. You may be more familiar with Taiwanese and Australian garlic, which have larger cloves and are easier to work with. But if you want a stronger, spicier flavor, go for native garlic. Philippine garlic comes in smaller bulbs, with cloves less than half the size of other types. This makes them hard to handle, but it's well worth the trouble.

Philippine onions are strong and pungent, making them a great source of flavor. Use native red onions for saut'ing and pickling, but use the white ones for salads and sandwiches. If you're making rice porridge, top it with chopped green onions for extra spice.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass has strong-smelling leaves and stalks commonly used in soups, teas and sauces. The leaf is slightly sweet with a hint of citrus, a perfect complement to gravy and other meat sauces. There are several ways to use lemongrass, but the most common method is cooking the fresh leaves (sometimes the entire stalk or bulb) with the food to release the flavor. If you're using the stalk, take only the soft inner part and chop it up before dropping it in. You can also use dried and powdered lemongrass, especially if you're in the city and fresh leaves are hard to find. 




Pandan

Pandan is mostly an aromatic ingredient, most commonly used with plain white rice. Just add a couple of leaves to your rice as it boils, and it comes out with a strong, inviting aroma. Some regions even weave it onto rice pots for an even stronger scent. You can do the same with rice cakes, puddings, and other Filipino desserts recipes.

Bay leaf

The strong, pungent taste of bay leaves makes them a perfect fit for Filipino cooking recipes. The leaf has a wide range of uses, from meat sauces and dips to main dishes like adobo, menudo and mechado. Dried bay leaves are traditionally used; fresh bay is seldom available in local markets. The leaf itself is not usually eaten; like ginger, you can take out the leaves once you're ready to serve. However, most people just leave them in and set them aside when eating.



About The Author:  
Carlo Villamayor is a devoted cook, he makes it his personal mission to spread the joy of one of his Filipino food recipes with food lovers the world over. Bon appetit!  (Source:  ArticleCity.com)




EES shares recipes, cooking tips
and all things foodie!

 




Friday, June 2, 2017

Foodie Friday : World Cuisine : Japan’s 10 weirdest ice cream flavors (Reblog)

ATTN Foodies and  food lovers. Check out this Top Ten List. Do you have a taste for something sweet, cold and delicious, yet strange and exotic or ... maybe just a little salty? Then you should probably be visiting an ice cream parlor in Japan. Have heard of sweet potato ice cream, which I thought was weird; but it's not on this list! Squid ink?? It's Number 8. Eh! It's soft serve! Worth a try! :)







Previous #FoodieFriday posts?


Saturday, May 27, 2017

One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian

A general review of the History of the Exotic Spice Trade will eventually lead to Indonesia.

"One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian
  • During the years 1602 to 1942, what is now the Republic of Indonesia was a Dutch colony. ... The tradition of Indonesian food known today as Rijstafel, which means Rice Table, was started by the Dutch. ..."

Read more at: Indonesian Food History – Rijistafel | Daily Two Cents

"Rijsttafel" by Jan Willem van Wessel from Rotterdam, Netherlands - Rijsttafel 13. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.





* * *
Can you write short posts - approximately 200 words - about a topic? 
Earn Money For Publishing Short Posts at Daily Two Cents (dailytwocents.com).



Search All of Our Foodie Sites. Hope You Find What You're Looking For!

Custom Search

Didn't Find What You Wanted? Search the Web!

Custom Search