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Showing posts with label cooking ingredients. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cooking ingredients. Show all posts

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Cooking Tips : No Need For a Special Diet to Use Ingredient Substitutes

Whether you believe eggs are good or bad, at least there are egg substitutes, in case you run out of eggs.



Imagine.
It's a holiday. 🎄
You're preparing a scrumptious meal. 
Many of the recipes require eggs. 
But! You run out of eggs! 
PANIC!! 
All the grocery stores are closed because ... it's a holiday! 
Can't borrow from the neighbors because every egg they have is CRITICAL!!  They're celebrating the holiday too.  

What do you do? 😨


This food chart (below) was made for vegans. But you don't have to be on a special diet to use cooking ingredient substitutes or alternatives.

By the way.  If this doesn't convince you to keep a ready supply of applesauce and tofu on hand, nothing will!  



Top 9 Plant-Based Egg Substitutes For A Healthy Diet








Saturday, June 24, 2017

Spices in Filipino Cuisine by Carlo Villamayor (Guest Post)

It's no secret that Filipino cuisine is one of the best in the world, but like any good food, it has to have its secrets. Few people have really mastered authentic Filipino food, not the washed-down fare you get in fast foods and diners, but real, home-made native dishes. Although most of us can whip up something when we need to, it can be hard to capture that distinct Filipino taste.

So what really goes into our food? How do you make your food taste truly Filipino? There's really no single answer, because no one can define our food; we come from a hodgepodge of cultures, after all. But one thing that sets us apart from our Asian neighbors is our heavy use of spices. Whereas other cuisines prefer subtle hints of flavor, we like a big burst of it with every bite.

So that's the first rule: be generous with the spice. If you want your dish to fit in with other Filipino recipes, get to know the spices that go into them. Here are some of the most common.

Ginger

Ginger is used in most of Asian cuisine, and Filipino food recipes. In the Philippines, it is most commonly used in soups and stews; dishes such as arroz caldo (rice porridge), and tinola (chicken stew) use garlic as their main spice. It goes particularly well with chicken and fish dishes, where it provides a nice contrast to the strong meat flavors. Ginger is used both for flavor and aroma, although the flesh of the root is not always eaten. Most people just crush the root and drop it into the dish, then take it out just before serving.

Chili

We're not as wild about spicy food as the Thais, but we do like a bit of bite in our food. Virtually every Filipino dish can be spiced up with chili peppers, from rich meat viands to everyday soups and noodles. Sauces like patis (fish sauce) and soy sauce are often mixed with crushed chili and used as dips or marinades. Bicol, a region in southeastern Luzon, is known for using chili peppers in most of its dishes. Perhaps the most popular is Bicol express, made with meat, bagoong (saut'ed shrimp paste), coconut milk, and chopped green chilies.

Garlic and onions

These two almost always go together, especially in meat and vegetable dishes. You may be more familiar with Taiwanese and Australian garlic, which have larger cloves and are easier to work with. But if you want a stronger, spicier flavor, go for native garlic. Philippine garlic comes in smaller bulbs, with cloves less than half the size of other types. This makes them hard to handle, but it's well worth the trouble.

Philippine onions are strong and pungent, making them a great source of flavor. Use native red onions for saut'ing and pickling, but use the white ones for salads and sandwiches. If you're making rice porridge, top it with chopped green onions for extra spice.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass has strong-smelling leaves and stalks commonly used in soups, teas and sauces. The leaf is slightly sweet with a hint of citrus, a perfect complement to gravy and other meat sauces. There are several ways to use lemongrass, but the most common method is cooking the fresh leaves (sometimes the entire stalk or bulb) with the food to release the flavor. If you're using the stalk, take only the soft inner part and chop it up before dropping it in. You can also use dried and powdered lemongrass, especially if you're in the city and fresh leaves are hard to find. 




Pandan

Pandan is mostly an aromatic ingredient, most commonly used with plain white rice. Just add a couple of leaves to your rice as it boils, and it comes out with a strong, inviting aroma. Some regions even weave it onto rice pots for an even stronger scent. You can do the same with rice cakes, puddings, and other Filipino desserts recipes.

Bay leaf

The strong, pungent taste of bay leaves makes them a perfect fit for Filipino cooking recipes. The leaf has a wide range of uses, from meat sauces and dips to main dishes like adobo, menudo and mechado. Dried bay leaves are traditionally used; fresh bay is seldom available in local markets. The leaf itself is not usually eaten; like ginger, you can take out the leaves once you're ready to serve. However, most people just leave them in and set them aside when eating.



About The Author:  
Carlo Villamayor is a devoted cook, he makes it his personal mission to spread the joy of one of his Filipino food recipes with food lovers the world over. Bon appetit!  (Source:  ArticleCity.com)




EES shares recipes, cooking tips
and all things foodie!

 




Monday, June 5, 2017

Perfect Gift for the High School Graduate Who is Off to College - A Cookbook!

A Cookbook? For a college student? Am I nuts?

No. No I am not. During my freshman year or first year of college, I was fortunate because I had a meal plan. As long as I got to the cafeteria before closing time, I didn't starve! But for my remaining 3 years at the university, I lived in an on-campus apartment and my roommates (friends I made when I was just a freshman who lived in the apartments) loved to cook!! The Chinese-Jamaican guy who lived in the apartment above ours always had good smelling coming out of his kitchen! His specialty was curry chicken. 

But before I get too far down memory lane and forget why I am writing this post, let me get back on track. The purpose of this post is to recommend a cookbook for a student you know who is heading off to college, already in college, getting ready to graduate from college. In fact, this cookbook is great for anybody!!!


Gift Idea found at Fabulous Ideas For Graduation Gifts - Daily Two Cents

Friday, April 21, 2017

Foodie Friday : World Cuisine : Cooking : The Right Blend of Spices for Cajun Food Lovers

Enjoy Everyday Exotic Spices Every Day!

If you are a spicy food lover then more than likely Cajun food is on your list of most awesome world cuisines ever! Right? But you don’t know just the right blend of spices needed get that authentic spicy Cajun flavor. Also right. Huh?


Image credit: © Photographer: Ppy2010ha | Agency: Dreamstime.com
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Ever tried Slap Ya Mama seasonings?

Interesting name huh?. The way Walker & Sons advertise their food products is:

"Taste so good. Make you wanna slap ya mama!"

Say what??!! There is nothing in my entire life that I've eaten that ever made me want to slay my momma. But guess what? These are award-winning spice blends.

"Real Cajun Seasoning for Real Cajun Cooking."

How did I find out about these products? The Internet and Facebook, in particular, is a beautiful thing. This person saw my foodie website, Everyday Exotic Spices, which is advertised on Facebook via my business page, contacted me, and asked if they could send me samples. Of course, my response was “Yes!”
Received various products in a box delivered straight to my door. Tried them in different recipes and here's my reaction. Did I want to slap my momma? No. But I was ready go mano-y-mano with my spouse!
He wanted to keep it all to himself. I'm like: “Oh no! That ain't happening!!”

View the entire selection of Slap Ya Mama products.

Below are my favorites.


Slap Ya Mama Original Blend Seasoning



Slap Ya Mama Cajun Seasoning White Pepper Blend



Slap Ya Mama Cajun Seasoning Hot Blend



Slap Ya Mama Etouffee Sauce

"Étouffée or etouffee (pronounced: [e.tu.fe] ay-TOO-fay) is a dish found in both Cajun and Creole cuisine typically served with shellfish over rice." (Source: Wikipedia)

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Links of Interest:
Cajun Food History and Louisiana Creole Cuisine History
Cajun vs. Creole: What’s The Difference?

Hope you enjoyed this post.


Image credit: © Photographer: Moneca1 | Agency: Dreamstime.com



Previous #FoodieFriday posts?


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Food Blog Spotlight: Tofu is the New Black on Tumblr

So glad such a thing as a spotlight was invented. The concept or idea of shining a light on something or someone worthy of being noticed comes in handy when you find a fantabulous food blog like “Tofu is the New Black”. 

My foodie adventures around the web often either begin here at this blog or at my complementary Tumblrmicro-blog. Was scanning the posts stream and came across this amazing blog. Fortunately the publisher, “Irene”, introduces herself in both Italian and English. (No problem if she didn't. I keep my Google translator at the ready! 🙂 ) 



Irene is a vegan and not only does she share great vegan recipes but the food images at her blog show off some of the prettiest food I've ever seen!  She scours the web and recycles recipes, cooking tips, healthcare tips, charts displaying food alternatives or substitutes, infographics, and other food finds.  She is PRO-Green and extremely environmentally conscious (as we all should be).  Her posts date back to August 2015. Got so excited just browsing January 2017, decided her food / foodie adventures needed to be shared with others. 



Pretty food!
http://happy-tofu.tumblr.com/post/135333234655/httphappy-tofutumblrcom



Healthcare Tips!
http://happy-tofu.tumblr.com/post/135333574570/httphappy-tofutumblrcom



Cheese Lovers!
http://happy-tofu.tumblr.com/post/135134167665/lemon-cranberry-pistachio-cashew-cheese-ball



Healthy Ways to Satisfy the Munchies!
http://happy-tofu.tumblr.com/post/125921885985/10-vegan-snacks-for-your-desk



Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Indian Food - Myth or Fact

Do you like Indian food? I do! Although must admit, had to acquire a taste for it. My first time trying a so-called authentic Indian dish was at one of those American mall-type food courts, where there are all kinds of restaurants for you to choose from. That probably wasn't the best place for me to get my first taste. Was taken aback by some sort of flavor or spice that my palette was clearly not expecting. It threw me off!


Later on, when cooking channels became so popular on television, started learning how to prepare Indian dishes. There was the one lady who referred to herself as a “spice goddess”.  Because really it comes to cooking, Indians do know their spices.  No argument.  Her recipes always seemed so simple, easy to prepare, and she explained the herbs and spices she used for flavoring and showed you how to incorporate them into the recipes.  Crush these seeds.  Warm this spice in the pan.  Sprinkle these herbs.  Decided to try Indian food again and was very pleased with the tasting tests.

Below is a link to a blog post that eliminates common myths about Indian food. Didn't know there were myths but good to know they can be ignored. What were some of the myths?

  • All Indian food is spicy.
  • All Indian food is vegetarian.
  • All Indian food is overloaded with curry.

Discover the Truth behind the Indian Food Myths



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Content first published Mar 21, 2015 via Persona Paper


5 Things You Thought You Knew about Indian Food


5 Things You Thought You Knew about Indian Food

By Petrina Verma Sarkar Come on, be honest. What are the first things that come to your mind when you think of Indian food? Hot, spicy, oily, rich, fatty, bad for you, difficult and time-consuming to cook, curry powder....


15 Interesting Facts Related To Indian Food You Should Know


15 Interesting Facts Related To Indian Food You Should Know

Facts that will blow your taste buds


20 unbelievable facts about Indian food


20 unbelievable facts about Indian food

Before it turned into an art that involved culinary expertise, food in India was about rasas and doshas. Taste or rasa in Sanskrit guides the tongue and it is a balance or misbalance of these rasas that cause or correct the doashas in body.


Known and unknown facts about Indian cooking


Known and unknown facts about Indian cooking

It is about experimenting with different spices and ingredients and to come up with your own secret recipes. Then just go for it, Visit Masala Fry! Enjoy!


Indian ladies: glitter-graphics.com

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