Showing posts with label republished content. Show all posts
Showing posts with label republished content. Show all posts

Thursday, May 25, 2017

ATTN Food Bloggers! Niume Accepts Republished Content

Do you love food? Need a place to share the love? Do you have old blog posts you would like to re-purpose and republish?  Niume.com is looking for contributors to their Food Sphere. Below is an example of a few of my contributions ("newbie") and articles submitted by experienced food bloggers.

Food History: Cuban Sandwich | Niume | Food Sphere



Related Niume Posts





  • Name your favorite Instant Noodle





  • My Exotic Vegetable Mix





  • Raw Goji Berry Coconut Pudding





  • Herb and Spice Spotlight : Capsicum (Red Pepper)





  • Health and Cooking Tip: Fresh Fruit or Dried Fruit?






  • Cuban Sandwiches - Gourmet Frozen Pork Appetizers (45 Piece Tray)





    The Beginner's Cuban Cookbook: An Easy Guide to Making Authentic Cuban Food for Novice Chefs



    Iberia Guava Paste (14 oz Bricks) 3 Pack
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    BLOGGING OPPORTUNITIES: Sites That Accept Republished Content
    • Niume is a collaborative blogging platform with multiple spheres (or topics).  The Food Spere is just one.  But if you are a food blogger you are encouraged to share your content.  This is site accepts republished content and allows you to promote your blog.  Create a free account and start immediately.  Click the button that says "Create a Post" and a quick form will pop up.  Must have a valid eMail address. 
    • Sign Up 

    Thursday, April 20, 2017

    "Baumkuchen", tasty and historic German cake | Recipes | Niume Food Sphere

    The ingredients for this scrumptious guilty pleasure include apricot jam, dark and white chocolate. Plus it's traditionally served at Christmas.  But you pick any holiday or special event or just treat yourself!

    How could you not want a piece of this cake?? 💟






    BLOGGING OPPORTUNITIES: Sites That Accept Republished Content
    • Niume is a collaborative blogging platform with multiple spheres (or topics).  The Food Spere is just one.  But if you are a food blogger you are encouraged to share your content.  This is site accepts republished content and allows you to promote your blog.  Create a free account and start immediately.  Click the button that says "Create a Post" and a quick form will pop up.  Must have a valid eMail address. 
    • Sign Up 

    Saturday, April 1, 2017

    Taste of the Islands - TV Cooking Show on PBS

    Finally! Singing the Hallelujah chorus. AGAIN!

    This time all the rejoicing is because of a food TV show.

    We relocated to Austin, Texas in 1998 and my mate's first observation about living in this land-locked part of the state was that the city was missing a good Bahamian restaurant or at least some place that serves dishes that look like island food!

    Once we got cable TV hooked up and got settled in, his next complaint was that the #foodie channels didn't have a good cooking show to teach people how to prepare common island meals.

    In 2015, his prayer was finally been answered.







    http://tastetheislandstv.com/chef-irie/Our public television station (PBS) airs a show called “Taste the Islands”. Chef Irie (real name Hugh Sinclair) lives in South Florida but is from Jamaica.

    My mate is from The Bahamas.

    Close enough!





     
    We're both very happy.
    For now.  :)


    * * * * * * PBS – Celebrating Food & Cooking


    Similar posts:





    Taste of the Islands first published at Persona Paper, Jul 20, 2015.

    Tuesday, December 27, 2016

    The India-Africa Cooking Connection

    For me, a hearty stew has always been the ultimate family-style comfort food. Prepare a big pot, fill the bowls of family, friends and honored guests, break bread, and chow down!! Such a meal can unite family and friends, make strangers feel welcome, and connect countries.





    Indians love curry. Africans like peanuts. This tidbit of info gleaned from researching world cuisine, global flavors, and food history . 


    * Michael Tracey is another one of my discoveries.

    He hails from Johannesburg, South Africa , publishes a newsletter called "THE TASTE OF AFRICA", and is the author of "AFRICAN RECIPES", an ethnic cookbook .

    The link below is to a Tanzanian recipe that links the #cultures of India and #Africa in every delicious spoonful.

    CURRIED SPINACH AND PEANUT BUTTER STEW

    clipartpanda.com







    (FYI: This is NOT an affiliate referral or commercial advertisement. The recipe is one of 260 recipes published in the cookbook which the author made available online. No purchase is required.)


    This content first appeared on Aug 5, 2015 at Persona Paper

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    Indian cuisine South Africa style blends Indian and African foods


    Indian cuisine South Africa style blends Indian and African foods

    South African Indian diaspora cuisine is deliciously distinct from that found in India itself. South Africans of Indian origin are generally descended either from South Indian people who arrived in the 1860s to work on the KwaZulu-Natal sugar plantations or from subsequent businessmen who came to service the retail needs of the farm workers.

    ♦♦♦

    Africa's 20 most popular foods: Biltong, fufu, injera, couscous, ugali anyone?


    Africa's 20 most popular foods: Biltong, fufu, injera, couscous, ugali anyone?

    African cuisine is as diverse as the hundreds of different cultures and groups that inhabit the continent. This diversity is reflected in the many local culinary traditions in terms of choice of ingredients, style of preparation and cooking techniques.

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    Indian Food - Myth or Fact

    Do you like Indian food? I do! Although must admit, had to acquire a taste for it. My first time trying a so-called authentic Indian dish was at one of those American mall-type food courts, where there are all kinds of restaurants for you to choose from. That probably wasn't the best place for me to get my first taste. Was taken aback by some sort of flavor or spice that my palette was clearly not expecting. It threw me off!


    Later on, when cooking channels became so popular on television, started learning how to prepare Indian dishes. There was the one lady who referred to herself as a “spice goddess”.  Because really it comes to cooking, Indians do know their spices.  No argument.  Her recipes always seemed so simple, easy to prepare, and she explained the herbs and spices she used for flavoring and showed you how to incorporate them into the recipes.  Crush these seeds.  Warm this spice in the pan.  Sprinkle these herbs.  Decided to try Indian food again and was very pleased with the tasting tests.

    Below is a link to a blog post that eliminates common myths about Indian food. Didn't know there were myths but good to know they can be ignored. What were some of the myths?

    • All Indian food is spicy.
    • All Indian food is vegetarian.
    • All Indian food is overloaded with curry.

    Discover the Truth behind the Indian Food Myths



    * * *
    Content first published Mar 21, 2015 via Persona Paper


    5 Things You Thought You Knew about Indian Food


    5 Things You Thought You Knew about Indian Food

    By Petrina Verma Sarkar Come on, be honest. What are the first things that come to your mind when you think of Indian food? Hot, spicy, oily, rich, fatty, bad for you, difficult and time-consuming to cook, curry powder....


    15 Interesting Facts Related To Indian Food You Should Know


    15 Interesting Facts Related To Indian Food You Should Know

    Facts that will blow your taste buds


    20 unbelievable facts about Indian food


    20 unbelievable facts about Indian food

    Before it turned into an art that involved culinary expertise, food in India was about rasas and doshas. Taste or rasa in Sanskrit guides the tongue and it is a balance or misbalance of these rasas that cause or correct the doashas in body.


    Known and unknown facts about Indian cooking


    Known and unknown facts about Indian cooking

    It is about experimenting with different spices and ingredients and to come up with your own secret recipes. Then just go for it, Visit Masala Fry! Enjoy!


    Indian ladies: glitter-graphics.com

    Monday, December 26, 2016

    3 Spices That Hold the Secrets of Longevity Per Mao Shing Ni (Dr. Mao)

    Mao Shing Ni (Dr. Mao), who is a board-certified anti-aging expert shares information about the 3 best spices for a longer life.

    Before you click the link (below) to the original article, give yourself 3 chances to guess the right combination of 3 spices that have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine and other Eastern traditions to cure common illnesses and maintain good health.  I only guessed one of the spices.  1 out of 3 is lower than a Grade F!!

    But now that I know what they are, I'm glad they're common, inexpensive and very easy to find.  So I don't travel over land and sea in search of the 3 mythical spices from the lost country of "Where Did You Get that?!"




    primary_spices
    Photo: Rev Dan Catt/Flickr 
     
     
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    "Garlic is as good as ten mothers."
     - Ancient Telugu proverb from India





    Saturday, December 24, 2016

    History Lesson : English Tea

    Tea in England

    Author: AnutaVasil



    The English primarily drank coffee and wine as their staple drink, and tea was unknown in England till as late as 1662. In 1662 Charles II married Catherine of Braganza of Portugal, and it was his new bride who brought with her a preference of tea. She served tea instead of wine, ale and spirit. Tea soon acquired the status of royal drink and a social nicety for the rich.

    However, tea's acceptance by British masses was quite slow. It was in late 1700 that tea's popularity picked up. As tea came from British colonies, it came to be viewed as a national drink, with patriotic sentiments attached to it. Another reason which contributed to its popularity was the ease of its preparation technique. While coffee grounds could be brewed only once, and reusing the same ground yielded a much inferior flavour, tea leaves could be brewed several times without any significant drop in the quality of liquor. As tea was a high class drink and hence expensive, the British masses bought second hand, brewed leaves and brewed them longer to compensate. Tea was thus gradually finding place in British everyday life.

    Soon, tea began to be sold in London coffee houses. Tea was heavily advertised as a medicinal drink which helped maintain health and beauty. The coffee house owners charged heavily for a cup of tea, as much as 6-10 pounds per cup. The government soon imposed various taxes, regulations and restrictions on sale of tea, with a view to cash in on the growing tea trend. This even led to tea being smuggled into England. Finally the taxes were waived off to stop this illegal smuggling.

    Tea, meanwhile, continued to grow in popularity. Around 1800, there developed an "Afternoon tea" culture, wherein rich ladies invited their friends for a cup of tea in the afternoon. They also served pastries, sandwiches or some snack along with it. It was accompanied by social graces, refined conversation, sweet gossip and polished etiquette. Yet another popular tea trend was serving tea in tea gardens. Pleasure gardens like Vauxhall or Ranelagh Gardens provided lush lawns for public to stroll and enjoy a hot cup of tea. The working class, however, took a break from work in the evening, and relaxed with tea.

    The most well liked and sought after teas were English breakfast tea and Earl Grey. English breakfast tea, as its name, was consumed mostly in the morning as its strong caffeine helped shake off sleepiness and start the morning energetically. It blended sumptuously with milk and sugar, and could be enjoyed anytime of the day. The Earl Grey provided a classic blend of fine black tea with bergamot essence. It was considered more sophisticated a tea.

    In 1875, Thomas Lipton aggressively advertised tea. He replaced the coffee gardens in Ceylon with tea plantations, and opened his first tea shop. By the end of 19th century, he had almost set up his Tea Empire and laid the foundations of modern tea trade. The Indian and Ceylon blends, Brooke Bond and Lipton found a firm place in British everyday life. Tea had finally "arrived" in England.


    About the Content Provider
    History of Tea and Tea Shops

    Article Source: www.articlesbase.com/tea-articles/tea-in-england-4328476.html

    ***
    BLOG PUBLISHER'S COMMENTS:   Hope you enjoyed this article.  Do you also enjoy tea?  Before you leave this please click the link to visit.





    http://shantiriiessence-blog.tumblr.com/post/12471507737

    Saturday, November 5, 2016

    QOD: Homemade Pizza or Buddha's Delight?

    Apologies for this late post. Last month, October, was National Pizza Month. But no matter. There are bazillions of pizza lovers in the world. So it's for sure that any foodie blog posts about pizza will be acceptable any time. :)


    Originally published at Persona Paper on April 30, 2015.


    Watched parts of two new cooking shows yesterday. Was torn between the two brand new episodes because they both came on at the same time, on different channels. (NO! Never learned how to program a VCR!)


    - So on one show the guy lives on a #farm and he was making #pizza . He milked the cow that morning and used that milk to make fresh #mozzarella #cheese .

    - On the other show, the lady was visiting a farm and planned to prepare dishes using freshly picked produce. She ended up serving a #vegetable platter. All sorts of root #veggies sliced thin like potato chips (raw; not cooked).

    QOD (Question of the Day):
    - If you have to choose between pizza and a veggie delight*, as your last supper, which would you pick?
    (* Some folks call a vegetable platter or plate with all veggies, Buddha's Delight.)


    * * *
    If it's my last supper, I'm going for the pizza – loaded with meat and veggies!! Extra large.  Extra cheese.  And I'm not sharing!!  :)  

    http://myspaceglitter.tumblr.com/post/52641472696
    Glitter Graphics found at MySpace Glitter on Tumblr



    * * *


    Have you visited my Pizza collection on Google Plus?























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