Showing posts with label Food and Cooking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Food and Cooking. Show all posts

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Spices in Filipino Cuisine by Carlo Villamayor (Guest Post)

It's no secret that Filipino cuisine is one of the best in the world, but like any good food, it has to have its secrets. Few people have really mastered authentic Filipino food, not the washed-down fare you get in fast foods and diners, but real, home-made native dishes. Although most of us can whip up something when we need to, it can be hard to capture that distinct Filipino taste.

So what really goes into our food? How do you make your food taste truly Filipino? There's really no single answer, because no one can define our food; we come from a hodgepodge of cultures, after all. But one thing that sets us apart from our Asian neighbors is our heavy use of spices. Whereas other cuisines prefer subtle hints of flavor, we like a big burst of it with every bite.

So that's the first rule: be generous with the spice. If you want your dish to fit in with other Filipino recipes, get to know the spices that go into them. Here are some of the most common.

Ginger

Ginger is used in most of Asian cuisine, and Filipino food recipes. In the Philippines, it is most commonly used in soups and stews; dishes such as arroz caldo (rice porridge), and tinola (chicken stew) use garlic as their main spice. It goes particularly well with chicken and fish dishes, where it provides a nice contrast to the strong meat flavors. Ginger is used both for flavor and aroma, although the flesh of the root is not always eaten. Most people just crush the root and drop it into the dish, then take it out just before serving.

Chili

We're not as wild about spicy food as the Thais, but we do like a bit of bite in our food. Virtually every Filipino dish can be spiced up with chili peppers, from rich meat viands to everyday soups and noodles. Sauces like patis (fish sauce) and soy sauce are often mixed with crushed chili and used as dips or marinades. Bicol, a region in southeastern Luzon, is known for using chili peppers in most of its dishes. Perhaps the most popular is Bicol express, made with meat, bagoong (saut'ed shrimp paste), coconut milk, and chopped green chilies.

Garlic and onions

These two almost always go together, especially in meat and vegetable dishes. You may be more familiar with Taiwanese and Australian garlic, which have larger cloves and are easier to work with. But if you want a stronger, spicier flavor, go for native garlic. Philippine garlic comes in smaller bulbs, with cloves less than half the size of other types. This makes them hard to handle, but it's well worth the trouble.

Philippine onions are strong and pungent, making them a great source of flavor. Use native red onions for saut'ing and pickling, but use the white ones for salads and sandwiches. If you're making rice porridge, top it with chopped green onions for extra spice.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass has strong-smelling leaves and stalks commonly used in soups, teas and sauces. The leaf is slightly sweet with a hint of citrus, a perfect complement to gravy and other meat sauces. There are several ways to use lemongrass, but the most common method is cooking the fresh leaves (sometimes the entire stalk or bulb) with the food to release the flavor. If you're using the stalk, take only the soft inner part and chop it up before dropping it in. You can also use dried and powdered lemongrass, especially if you're in the city and fresh leaves are hard to find. 




Pandan

Pandan is mostly an aromatic ingredient, most commonly used with plain white rice. Just add a couple of leaves to your rice as it boils, and it comes out with a strong, inviting aroma. Some regions even weave it onto rice pots for an even stronger scent. You can do the same with rice cakes, puddings, and other Filipino desserts recipes.

Bay leaf

The strong, pungent taste of bay leaves makes them a perfect fit for Filipino cooking recipes. The leaf has a wide range of uses, from meat sauces and dips to main dishes like adobo, menudo and mechado. Dried bay leaves are traditionally used; fresh bay is seldom available in local markets. The leaf itself is not usually eaten; like ginger, you can take out the leaves once you're ready to serve. However, most people just leave them in and set them aside when eating.



About The Author:  
Carlo Villamayor is a devoted cook, he makes it his personal mission to spread the joy of one of his Filipino food recipes with food lovers the world over. Bon appetit!  (Source:  ArticleCity.com)




EES shares recipes, cooking tips
and all things foodie!

 




Monday, June 5, 2017

Perfect Gift for the High School Graduate Who is Off to College - A Cookbook!

A Cookbook? For a college student? Am I nuts?

No. No I am not. During my freshman year or first year of college, I was fortunate because I had a meal plan. As long as I got to the cafeteria before closing time, I didn't starve! But for my remaining 3 years at the university, I lived in an on-campus apartment and my roommates (friends I made when I was just a freshman who lived in the apartments) loved to cook!! The Chinese-Jamaican guy who lived in the apartment above ours always had good smelling coming out of his kitchen! His specialty was curry chicken. 

But before I get too far down memory lane and forget why I am writing this post, let me get back on track. The purpose of this post is to recommend a cookbook for a student you know who is heading off to college, already in college, getting ready to graduate from college. In fact, this cookbook is great for anybody!!!


Gift Idea found at Fabulous Ideas For Graduation Gifts - Daily Two Cents

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Food Wishes Video Recipes: Grilled Hoisin Beef – Not Necessarily Mongolian (Reblog)

From Food Ways to Food Wishes. It's not that far. 👉

Chef John has been active on Blogger since 2007. He publishes Food Wishes Video Recipes, a wonderful food blogger and vlogger who likes to share a wide variety of recipes from A to Z, from African cuisine to Vegetables and Weekend Fillers. (No Video Category for the letters X, Y, and Z. But close enough!)



Over 200 food preparation "how to" videos and recipes for Vegetables, Appetizers, and Sauces; over 100 videos for Cooking Tips and Techniques, meat (Beef, Chicken, and Pork plus Seafood and Cheese); and specialties like Spicy food and Italian Cuisine. And of course, there's Dessert. You can find so much more because he has made the blog very easy to search.

Below is the cooking video that led me to his blog. I love hoisin sauce. Do you?

♦ ♦ ♦

Grilled Hoisin Beef Recipe - Grilled Beef Skirt Steak with Hoisin Glaze | Food Wishes






* Also sharing the links to two other blog posts. One post I'm sharing because in my opinion a party is not a party without great appetizers. The other post I'm sharing because I heart pomegranates and because I've never seen a non-red pomegranate. Have you?

Let's Get This Party Started Right - Announcing a New Appetizer Category!


Let's Get This Party Started Right - Announcing a New Appetizer Category!

Just in time for your New Years party planning; I've added a new video category for Appetizers . Many of the videos I've previously done wi...


Back By Popular Demand...The Secret Underwater Pomegranate Trick


Back By Popular Demand...The Secret Underwater Pomegranate Trick

I already ran this video demo a long time ago, but when my mother sent me a photo of some "Sweetheart" pomegranates (below right), I thought...

♦ ♦ ♦



👉 After you finish visiting with Chef John at Food Wishes, follow these links to some interesting and fun food history and trivia about the pomegranate and the other pomegranateEnjoy!

Friday, April 21, 2017

Foodie Friday : World Cuisine : Cooking : The Right Blend of Spices for Cajun Food Lovers

Enjoy Everyday Exotic Spices Every Day!

If you are a spicy food lover then more than likely Cajun food is on your list of most awesome world cuisines ever! Right? But you don’t know just the right blend of spices needed get that authentic spicy Cajun flavor. Also right. Huh?


Image credit: © Photographer: Ppy2010ha | Agency: Dreamstime.com
* * *

Ever tried Slap Ya Mama seasonings?

Interesting name huh?. The way Walker & Sons advertise their food products is:

"Taste so good. Make you wanna slap ya mama!"

Say what??!! There is nothing in my entire life that I've eaten that ever made me want to slay my momma. But guess what? These are award-winning spice blends.

"Real Cajun Seasoning for Real Cajun Cooking."

How did I find out about these products? The Internet and Facebook, in particular, is a beautiful thing. This person saw my foodie website, Everyday Exotic Spices, which is advertised on Facebook via my business page, contacted me, and asked if they could send me samples. Of course, my response was “Yes!”
Received various products in a box delivered straight to my door. Tried them in different recipes and here's my reaction. Did I want to slap my momma? No. But I was ready go mano-y-mano with my spouse!
He wanted to keep it all to himself. I'm like: “Oh no! That ain't happening!!”

View the entire selection of Slap Ya Mama products.

Below are my favorites.


Slap Ya Mama Original Blend Seasoning



Slap Ya Mama Cajun Seasoning White Pepper Blend



Slap Ya Mama Cajun Seasoning Hot Blend



Slap Ya Mama Etouffee Sauce

"Étouffée or etouffee (pronounced: [e.tu.fe] ay-TOO-fay) is a dish found in both Cajun and Creole cuisine typically served with shellfish over rice." (Source: Wikipedia)

* * *
Links of Interest:
Cajun Food History and Louisiana Creole Cuisine History
Cajun vs. Creole: What’s The Difference?

Hope you enjoyed this post.


Image credit: © Photographer: Moneca1 | Agency: Dreamstime.com



Previous #FoodieFriday posts?


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Taste of the Islands - TV Cooking Show on PBS

Finally! Singing the Hallelujah chorus. AGAIN!

This time all the rejoicing is because of a food TV show.

We relocated to Austin, Texas in 1998 and my mate's first observation about living in this land-locked part of the state was that the city was missing a good Bahamian restaurant or at least some place that serves dishes that look like island food!

Once we got cable TV hooked up and got settled in, his next complaint was that the #foodie channels didn't have a good cooking show to teach people how to prepare common island meals.

In 2015, his prayer was finally been answered.







http://tastetheislandstv.com/chef-irie/Our public television station (PBS) airs a show called “Taste the Islands”. Chef Irie (real name Hugh Sinclair) lives in South Florida but is from Jamaica.

My mate is from The Bahamas.

Close enough!





 
We're both very happy.
For now.  :)


* * * * * * PBS – Celebrating Food & Cooking


Similar posts:





Taste of the Islands first published at Persona Paper, Jul 20, 2015.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

World Cuisine: Great Recipes from Around the World (and Texas)

Have a grocery and gourmet website, specializes in herb and spices.  Often find gems around the web that are reshared in my business pages, Google+ and Facebook.

 

Though I am a contributor, my articles for HUBPages.com are not food-related but the Food and Cooking section of this website is loaded!!  So I shared some links here too.  Enjoy!




A handy reference list. Descriptive list of the different and popular dishes from the Philippines that every Filipino family have enjoyed cooking and serving on their dinner table.
A Taste of the Caribbean: Make Jamaican Patties for Supper!  This is a great recipe for authentic tasting Jamaican Patties; delicious golden pastry filled with curried beef and spices.
Recipes from the indigenous peoples of French Polynesia and their Marquesas Islands.
Brawn Loaf, Christmas Cake, Wattelseed Pavlova …



Biltong – A cured meat that originated from South Africa and often compared to the American jerky.
East African cuisine is the food of countries such as Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda.

Greek Tzatziki is a great way to use cucumbers!
People often mix up oriental cuisines – they mix up Korean food with Chinese and Japanese. In reality, even though the Korean cuisine is partly influenced by Chinese and Japanese cooking, Korean food also has its very own unique taste and cooking techniques.

Quick and Easy Beef Kimbap Recipe

Quick and Easy Beef Kimbap Recipe

In my hub titled 5 Asian Dishes You Can Make at Home (link below), I mentioned my love for the beef kimbap (sometimes also called kimbob). A kimbap is basically the Korean version of the Sushi. It is a rice roll with some fillings wrapped in nori or dried seaweed wrap.

When in Texas, eat like a Texan. Especially enjoy some of the fusion cuisine, like Tex-Mex. (Fusion cuisine refers to a style of food that combines elements of different cuisines.)

Top Ten Best Texas Food Recipes and How to Cook Like a Texan


Top Ten Best Texas Food Recipes and How to Cook Like a Texan

Cooking like a Texas? This means you must at least know how to cook barbecue brisket and big bowls of thick, hot, hearty steamy chili con carne!






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